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What does the 3/5 compromise?

2022-07-13 13:00:03
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What does the 3/5 compromise?

What Is The Three-Fifths Compromise? meaning that every five slaves in a state would count as three free people for the purposes of determining how many congresspeople a state would be allotted. The three-fifths compromise has since been superseded by the Fourteenth Amendment.

What was the Three-Fifths Compromise quizlet?

A compromise where every 5 enslaved people counted as 3 in the states population. Leaders that came together to change the Articles of Confederation.

Why did the 3/5 compromise help the South?

The Three-Fifths compromise gave southern states disproportionate representation in the House of Representatives relative to free states, thereby helping the southern states to preserve slavery.

What was the Three-Fifths Compromise and why did it happen?

The Three-fifths Compromise was an agreement reached during the 1787 United States Constitutional Convention over the counting of slaves in determining a state's total population. This count would determine the number of seats in the House of Representatives and how much each state would pay in taxes.

How did the three fifths compromise impact South Carolina?

Southern states had wanted representation apportioned by population; after the Virginia Plan was rejected, the Three-Fifths Compromise seemed to guarantee that the South would be strongly represented in the House of Representatives and would have disproportionate power in electing Presidents.

What were the 3 major compromises in the Constitution?

The three major compromises were the Great Compromise, the Three-Fifths Compromise, and the Electoral College.

How did the 3/5 compromise affect taxes?

The 3/5 compromise gave the south more representatives in the house and therefore more control over taxes. The south would have liked 5/5 of the slaves counted toward representation giving the south more control over how the taxes would be spent.

Who opposed the 3/5 compromise?

Massachusetts Anti-Federalists

The ratification of the United States Constitution was the subject of intense debate between 1787 and 1789.